How to Use a DMM

A digital multimeter is a vital instrument to anyone who works with electronics. It has many uses which include measuring, troubleshooting, and testing any electric instrument. It also has different calibrations and measurements to help you understand some of the basics of these settings. You can make maximum use out of this device by using the rotating knobs on the digital multimeter interface to calibrate with different units for measuring AC current, DC current, AC voltage, Dc voltage, resistance and continuity on the circuit.

If you want to use your digital multimeter to measure voltage, tune the knob to the voltage symbol, and plug the red probe into the red diode, ohm, and voltage jack. The black probe is plugged into the com jack. The other side of the red probe makes contact with the positive side of the source of voltage while the black end of the probe is connected to the negative source of voltage.

If you want to measure very small voltages in minivolts, tune the knob to the minivolt sign and then take the red probe and insert it into the ohm, diode, and voltage jack. Take the black probe and insert it into the com jack. The other end of the red probe should make contact with voltage source while the black end makes contact with the negative side of the source of voltage. The readings displayed on the DDM are in minivolts.

Supposing you want to test your AC power supply. Tune the knob to where it shows the AC voltage sign. Take the red probe and plug it in the ohm, voltage, diode jack. Take the black probe and plug it in the com jack. Take the other end of the black probe and hold it against the negative side of the power source. Also, take the other end of the red probe and hold it against the end of the positive side. The readings you see represent the voltage of the AC power source.

Testing for small AC voltages in minivolts will follow the same procedure. Tune the knob to the sign for AC minivolts. Take the red probe and insert it into the voltage, ohm, and diode jack while the other end is held onto the positive side of the AC power. The black probe is plugged in the com jack while the other end is held on the negative side of the AC power. The readings you will record are in minivolts.

A digital multimeter can also be used to test resistance. While testing resistance, tune the knob to the ohm sign and then take the red probe and insert it into the voltage, ohm, and diode jack while the other end is connected to the positive side of the resistor. Then take the black probe and insert it into the com plug while the other end is connected to the negative end of the resistor. The readings will indicate how much resistance there is in the device.

When using a DDM (digital multimeter) for measuring continuity, tune the knob to the continuity sign. Then take the red probe and plug it in the diode, ohm, and voltage jack. The black probe is inserted on the com jack. Take one end of the lead wire you’re testing and hold it on the other end of the red probe. The other end of the wire is made to make contact the other end of the black probe. If there is continuity in the wire, then the multi meter will beep. If there is no change seen then the wire has a problem.

To test for DC current (Amperes), tune the knob to the DC amperes sign. The red probe is plugged in the Amperes jack while the black probe is inserted in the com jack. The other end of the red probe is connected with the positive side of the source of current. The other end of the black probe is held on the negative side of the current source.

If you want to test for AC current, tune the knob to where there is AC ampere sign. Plug red probe in the red A-jack and the black one into com jack. Hold the other end of the red robe on the positive end of the circuit while the other ends of the black probe onto the negative end of the circuit. You can find more great deals on tools and home improvement devices here style=!

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